History group

IMG_20150425_132839195_HDREdward Fennell reports on David’s talk from April 2015

“My aim is to make stones interesting!” said David Spurling to a packed Hyde Parish Hall in late April. A tough challenge, you might think? But not really. David, who lives in Headbourne Worthy, is passionate about the stones from Hyde Abbey. He hunts them down with the true spirit of the adventurer, climbing ladders, peering into foundations and getting his hands dirty in rescuing them from the bowels of skips.

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Intrigued by the large stone fireplace and chimney in his relatively modest cottage in Headbourne Worthy, David Spurling set out on a personal quest to find their origins and the significance of the marks carved on them. This led to a trail of scavenged and re-used building blocks from Hyde Abbey, scattered across Winchester and beyond.

On Saturday 25th April, David will talk about the results so far.

More about the talk

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The case for re-excavating Hyde Abbey

datePosted on 11:14, December 22nd, 2014 by Site admin

Partly as a consequence of the conclusion to the Unmarked Grave Investigation, there has been a resurgence of interest in the Hyde Abbey Site where Hyde Abbey Garden is now located. In particular, and contrary to popular understanding, it now appears that there is still much to be investigated that could reveal significant new information about this important site.

This would be a very significant step and requires extensive consultation with all those involved before any plans can be made. But we believe that it needs serious consideration, and very preliminary discussions have begun.

Professor Martin Biddle’s paper setting out the case for re-excavation is here:

Hyde Abbey re-excavation principles and practice (PDF)

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Soldiers of Hyde Project

datePosted on 13:13, November 1st, 2014 by Site admin

Helmetcleang5Under the auspices of Hyde 900 there is a project afoot to research and document the lives of the soldiers of the First World War who are commemorated in St Bartholemew’s Church.

Apart from Regiment, Rank and Age, the intent is to explore the stories behind the names, to bring to our very comfortable and peaceful lives in Hyde today, a concept of the community during this time.

If you are interested in joining a working party; enjoy research –   ably assisted by Alys Blakeway and  would like to take part in what  promises to be a fascinating task, with an excellent group of  ‘ Hydeites’  please contact Caroline Scott on 01962853997 or e mail [email protected] or [email protected]

Equally if anyone has any information on any of the soldiers who so sadly did not return, all leads are welcome at this initial stage.     

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King Alfred Weekend 2014

datePosted on 16:59, September 24th, 2014 by Site admin

King Alfred statue, Winchester

Hyde900 presents a weekend of events around the theme of Alfred the Great, jointly organised by Hyde900 and St Bartholomew’s Church.

Ruler of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex from AD871 to 899, Alfred subdued the invading Vikings and brought about a new era of learning, culture and law that built the foundations of our modern society. Having been buried in the New Minster in central Winchester for over 200 years, his remains were transferred to the newly-built Hyde Abbey in AD1110. October 26th 2014 marks the 1115th anniversary of his death.

Since 2012, Hyde900 has organised an annual weekend of events on subjects relating to King Alfred and Hyde.

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Hyde900 visits The National Archives

datePosted on 11:04, September 17th, 2014 by Site admin

archives-kew (Read-Only)Thanks to Steve Brine MP a group from Hyde900 was able to visit The National Archives (TNA) in Kew to examine key documents in the history of Hyde Abbey.

Hosted by Adrian Ailes, Principal Records Specialist at the TNA, the Chairman of Hyde900, Steve Marper, and Founder, Edward Fennell, along with five colleagues and Alison Lawrence from the University of Winchester, were able to look closely at some of the most important sources of information about Hyde in the sixteenth century.

The highlight of the display was the Valor Ecclesiasticus which was commissioned by Henry the Eighth so he would know how much wealth the Church had in England and Wales. This information was used to decide which monasteries should be closed and effectively sealed the fate of the abbey at Hyde because it revealed the considerable assets held within the monastic establishment (including those of the hospitality department!). The next step in the Hyde Abbey story was then represented by the ‘surrender document’ signed by the Abbot of Hyde, John Salcot, and the remaining monks when they departed leaving the abbey to be pillaged and pulled down by Thomas Wriothesley, a favoured henchman of the king. Read the rest of this entry »

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Hyde900 explores Alfred’s London

datePosted on 14:20, June 3rd, 2014 by Site admin
Walk

Walking King Alfred’s London

 

On Saturday 17th May an intrepid group of Hyde900 members and friends along with Morris the cockerpoo, set off in search of King Alfred’s London, in the capable hands of City of London Guide, Val Pretlove.

 

Assembling in the crypt of St Paul’s Cathedral we learnt that after the Romans packed up and left Londinium in 410 AD, it was abandoned and used as farmland. In 886 AD Alfred reclaimed and regenerated the city by taking the land from the Vikings and turning it into the habitable Lundenburgh; building houses, markets and churches, creating streets and wards and a structure of governance headed by aldermen.  The current Queenhithe and Billingsgate became important quays.

 

The first St Paul’s Cathedral had been founded in 604 AD and burnt down in 962 AD. The rebuilt church was moved to the current site, probably on to the site of a Roman temple on the western hill away from the derelict Roman forum and basilica. Whilst Alfred would have been familiar with the area where we were standing, he certainly would not have been familiar with the traffic and building noise that assailed us once we moved out of the cathedral precincts. Read the rest of this entry »

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